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A unit of the University System of Georgia

Course Descriptions

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The unit of credit associated with all course work is the semester hour. Each credit course offered by Gordon State College is designated in this catalog by a three digit code to indicate the number of semester hours associated with the course. For example, ENGL 1101 is designated with the code (3-0-3). The first digit (3-0-3) indicates the number of semester hours per week the course meets in a lecture; the second digit (3-0-3) indicates the number of semester hours per week the course meets in a laboratory or practicum setting; and the third digit (3-0-3) indicates the total number of semester hours the course receives.

Laboratory science courses, except biology, are designated in this catalog with the letter K (e.g., Principles of Chemistry I is designated CHEM 1211K). Laboratory sections for biology courses are designated in course schedules with the letter L (e.g., Principles of Biology I Lab is designated as BIOL 1107L in course schedules).          

Each course description listed below includes a four letter course prefix, a four digit course number, the course title, course prerequisites, a credit hour designation, and a brief course description. The prerequisite listing is designed to make students aware of any restrictions that may prevent them from registering for that course.

SPECIAL PREREQUISITE REQUIREMENTS FOR LEARNING SUPPORT STUDENTS

The prerequisite listings given above apply only to students without Learning Support requirements. Students with Learning Support requirements have additional restrictions placed on them. For a complete listing of courses that may be taken concurrently with Learning Support courses, see page 66 of this catalog.

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ACCOUNTING

ACCT 2101

Principles of Accounting I
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts.

ACCT 2102

Principles of Accounting II
Prerequisite: ACCT 2101
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts.

ACCT 2103

The Accounting Cycle
Prerequisite: ACCT 2101
Credit Hours: (1-1-1)

A study of the accounting cycle from posting of original journal entries to the preparation of the trial balance, balance sheet, income statement, and statement of retained earnings. A combination of lecture and hands-on applications of computerized accounting systems will be used throughout the course.

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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 1102

Introduction to Anthropology
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A survey of general anthropology, the comparative study of humankind as a whole, including its major subdisciplines: cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and physical anthropology.

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ART

ARTS 1100

Art Appreciation
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the visual arts, including a study of design principles, media, and a brief history of art. This course is designed for non-art majors.

ARTS 1101

Survey of Art History I
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A survey of the global history of the visual arts and architecture from prehistoric times to the Gothic period. This course offers significant comparative study of art and architecture in a global context.

ARTS 1102

Survey of Art History II
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A survey of the global history of visual arts and architecture from the Renaissance to the 20th Century. This course offers significant comparative study of art and architecture in a global context.

ARTS 1111

Drawing I
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An introduction to basic drawing skills and techniques emphasizing observational drawings from life.

ARTS 1112

Drawing II
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An exploration of traditional and contemporary approaches to drawing and drawing media, including sustained studies from life and live models.

ARTS 1113

Two-Dimensional Design
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

A study of the elements and principles of design, including a series of related projects to help explore these concepts.

ARTS 1114

Three-Dimensional Design
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An exploration of design problems in three-dimensional space, including subtractive sculpture and additive constructions in various media.

ARTS 2211

Black and White Photography
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An introduction to black and white photographic darkroom techniques and composition, including a history of photography and an introduction to digital technology.

ARTS 2212

Ceramics
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An introduction to hand building and wheel throwing processes, including an exploration of surface design techniques and various firing methods (including raku).

ARTS 2214

Painting I
Prerequisite: ARTS 1111 and ARTS 1113 or consent of instructor.
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An introduction to the fundamentals of painting, including sustained studies of the still-life and figure.

ARTS 2215

Painting II
Prerequisite: ARTS 2214
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

A further investigation of painting, with emphasis on individual expression. May be taken by the non-transfer hobby painter with the permission of the instructor.

ARTS 2216

Printmaking
Prerequisite: ARTS 1111 and ARTS 1113
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An introduction to relief, intaglio, and silk screen printmaking processes.

ARTS 2221

Digital Photography
Credit Hours: (0-6-3)

An introduction to historical, technical, and comjpositional aspects of digital photography.

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ASTRONOMY

ASTR 1010K

Astronomy of the Solar System
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

Astronomy from early ideas of the cosmos to modern observational techniques. The solar system planets, satellites, and minor bodies. The origin and evolution of the solar system.

ASTR 1020K

Stellar and Galactic Astronomy
Prerequisite: MATH 1001, MATH 1111 or any higher level MATH course
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

The study of the sun and stars, their physical properties and evolution, interstellar matter, star clusters, our galaxy and other galaxies, and the origin and evolution of the universe.

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BIOLOGY

Laboratory science courses, except biology, are designated in this catalog with the letter K (e.g., Principles of Chemistry I is designated CHEM 1211K). Laboratory sections for biology courses are designated in course schedules with the letter L (e.g., Principles of Biology I Lab is designated as BIOL 1107L in course schedules).

BIOL 1011

Natural Science
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Topics in biology, environmental science, and medical health.

BIOL 1050

Introduction to Human Biology
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the study of the human body, the human organ systems, and heredity.

BIOL 1107

Principles of Biology I
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

An introduction to elementary principles of biology, including cell structure, physiology of cells, bioenergetics, Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics and evolution, biological structure, classification, reproduction, development, physiology, and ecology. This course is intended for Biology majors and select other majors. If a student takes both BIOL 1107 and BIOL 1111, only one of these will count toward the Area D science requirement.

BIOL 1108

Principles of Biology II
Prerequisite: BIOL 1107
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

A second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of biology. This course is intended for Biology majors and selected other majors. If a student takes both BIOL 1108 and BIOL 1112, only one of these will count toward the Area D science requirement.

BIOL
1108H

Honors Principles of Biology II
Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1107 with a grade of B or better, along with acceptance into the Honors Program or the permission of the Honors Program Coordinator
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

A second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of biology. This course is specific for Honors Biology and other Honors majors. In addition to the regular BIOL 1108 content, this course provides an introduction to peer-reviewed scientific literature and affords additional practice in experimental design, execution, and reporting. If a student takes both BIOL 1112 and BIOL 1108 (or BIOL 1108H), only one of these will count toward the Area D science requirement.

BIOL 1111

Introductory Biology I
Prerequisite: Not open to students who are enrolled in BIOL 1107 or who have credit for BIOL 1107
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

General topics to be covered include cell structure and function, cell division, plant and animal energy pathways, genetics, and evolution. This course is intended for non-science majors only. If a student takes both BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1107, only one of these will count toward the Area D science requirement. The other may be used in Area B.

BIOL 1112

Introductory Biology II
Prerequisites: BIOL 1111 or BIOL 1107; not open to students who have credit for BIOL 1108
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

General topics to be covered include diversity of viruses and bacteria, plant and animal classification, structure and function of major plant and animal systems and ecology. This course is intended for non-science majors only. If a student takes both BIOL 1112 and BIOL 1108, only one of these will count toward the Area D science requirement. The other may be used in Area B.

BIOL 2100

Scientific Communications
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in each of the following courses: BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108 or BIOL 1108H, MATH 1111 or MATH 1113, and ENGL 1101 or ENGL 1101H
Credit Hours: (2-0-2)

An introduction to scientific literature, experimental design, and research methods in the biological sciences. This course will address computer and research skills utilized in the biological sciences and related fields. Topics will include effectively searching scientific literature, evaluating primary research articles, the scientific method and experimental design, collecting and analyzing data, scientific writing skills, bioethics and plagiarism, effective presentation methods, and an overview of the peer review process. This course is designed for freshman and sophomore Biology majors.

 

BIOL 2210

Anatomy and Physiology I
Prerequisite: One of the following courses: BIOL 1111, BIOL 1107, CHEM 1151K, or CHEM 1211K with the grade of C or better, or SAT Math score of 450 or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher.
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

An introduction to elementary principles of anatomy and physiology, including human histology, cytology, physiology of human systems (with emphasis on pathology), protein synthesis, and cellular respiration.

BIOL 2211

Anatomy and Physiology II
Prerequisite: BIOL 2210
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

A second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of anatomy and physiology.

BIOL 2250

Microbiology for Health Sciences
Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2210
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Topics in microbiology, including micro-organisms and immunology with emphasis on pathology.

BIOL 2295

Special Research Topics
Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 and/or BIOL 1108
Credit Hours: (0-3-1)

Faculty guided student research utilizing laboratory, library, or computer resources.

BIOL 3100

Biochemistry
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 2401K
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Introduction to the principles of biological chemistry. Concepts covered include the structure and function of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, metabolic processes and bioenergetics.

BIOL 3200

Genetics
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Corequisite: CHEM 2401K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Study of the fundamental principles of genetics including classical, molecular, population, and cytogenetics. This course includes the structure, function, regulation, and transmission of hereditary materials in viruses, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. The laboratory exercises will represent the major methods and techniques used in both classical and molecular genetics.

BIOL 3300

Cellular and Molecular Biology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Introduction to the cellular and molecular basis of biology. Key concepts covered will include function, structure, development, and interaction of cells at the molecular level. The laboratory exercises will represent the major methods and techniques used in modern cellular and molecular biology.

BIOL 3340

Microbiology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

A study of prokaryotes, unicellular eukaryotic organisms, and viruses, emphasizing morphology, physiology, control, identification, symbiotic relationships, evolution and practical applications. Immunology is studied as a response of vertebrates to microbial infection. The laboratory emphasizes basic microbiological methods of culture and identification of microorganisms. The role of microbes in the environment and in medicine is also investigated.

BIOL 3500

Ecology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Study of the relationships between the biotic and abiotic at the individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Topics include species diversity, population dynamics, organization and classification of communities, and chemical and energy flows in ecosystems. The laboratory exercises will emphasize experimental design, sampling and collection procedures in field studies, and statistical analysis of data. Off-campus field studies may be required.

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BIOL 3520

Invertebrate Zoology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Study of invertebrate organisms with emphasis on phylogeny, comparative morphology and physiology, behavior, and ecology. Labs may include field studies, both on-campus and off.

BIOL 3550

Vertebrate Zoology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Study of vertebrate organisms with emphasis on phylogeny, comparative morphology and physiology, behavior, and ecology. Labs may include field studies, both on- and off-campus.

BIOL 3600

Plant Biology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

A broad, integrated overview of photosynthetic organisms. Topics include plant evolution and diversity, structure, function, and development, and plant ecology. Discussions include the economic and environmental impact of photosynthetic organisms. Laboratory exercises may include plant growth and development, propagation, and experiments relating to practical applications of plant biology
BIOL 4000

Senior Seminar
Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 3200, BIOL 3300, BIOL 3500, and BIOL 4200
Credit Hours: (2-0-2)

A senior capstone integrative experience where students will apply biological theory and knowledge during the discussion and presentation of relevant topics. Demonstrated oral and written competency in the interpretation of scientific literature and research is required.

BIOL 4100

Philosophy and Ethics of Biology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Survey of the major ethical issues relating to biological and medical research and practice, as well as a discourse on the major philosophical issues of the biological sciences. This course will include oral and written discussion of scientific publications.

BIOL 4200

Evolution
Corequisite: BIOL 3200
Credit hours: (3-0-3)

Principles of evolutionary biology, including discussions of natural selection, adaptation, population genetics, speciation, and phylogeny reconstruction. The importance of the theory of evolution in all biological disciplines is emphasized. The applications of evolutionary biology in areas such as conservation biology, medicine, and agriculture are discussed. Critical analysis, discussion, and presentation of relevant literature is required.

BIOL 4350

Comparative Physiology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 3200, BIOL 3300, or BIOL 3500
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

This course examines homeostatic mechanisms and general physiology of vertebrate animals. Physiological systems are explored using a comparative approach.

BIOL 4450

Molecular Biology
Prerequisite: BIOL 3200
Credit hours: (3-3-4)

Study of macromolecular biochemistry. Emphasis will be on structure, function, and relationships of macromolecules in organisms.

BIOL 4460

Immunology
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300; BIOL 3340 recommended
Credit hours: (3-0-3)

Study of the cells, molecules, and mechanisms of innate and adaptive defense provided against invading microorganisms.

BIOL 4500

Biotechnology
Prerequisite: BIOL 3200
Credit hours: (3-3-4)

Survey of methods and techniques used in modern molecular and organismal biology. Topics include advances in discovery and manipulation of genetic material, regulation of protein expression, and new techniques in population biology, agriculture, and evolutionary processes.

BIOL 4600

Mammalogy
Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 3500 or BIOL 3550 with a grade of "C" or better
Credit hours: (3-3-4)

Study of the classification, phylogeny, natural history, economic importance, and literature of mammals on a world-wide basis. Laboratory involves identification of mammals in addition to methods of field study, collection, and preservation, with emphasis on species occurring in Georgia. Outdoor field work and one or more overnight field trips are required.

BIOL 4700

Developmental Biology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 3200 or BIOL 3300
Credit hours: (3-3-4)

Study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical mechanisms involved in the patterning and develoopmental of body axes, tissues, organs, and organ systems during vertebrate embryonic development. Special emphasis will be placed on medical implications of human development, environmental implications on development, and developmental mechanisms of evolutionary change.

BIOL 4750

Principles of Virology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 3300 and BIOL 4200
Credit hours: (3-0-3)

An examination of the principles and applications of virology. Topics covered in this course will include virological methods, virus structure, virus transmission, virus replication, the outcomes of viral infection, classification of viruses, and viral diversity.

BIOL 4800

Curriculum and Instruction in Science Education
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy in Teacher Education Program
Corequisite: EDUC 3005
Credit hours: (3-0-3)

This course is designed to develop basic science knowledge, concepts, and skills and incorporate them into learning experiences for middle and secondary students. Planning, teaching, evaluation and organization skills, including laboratory skills, are applied to the teaching of science at the middle and secondary level. Fieldwork component required.

BIOL 4900

Special Topics in Biology
Prerequisite: BIOL 3200 and three other upper level BIOL courses, excluding BIOL 4905
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Selected special or current topics of interest to faculty and students.

BIOL 4901

Special Topics in Biology with Lab
Prerequisite: BIOL 3200 and three other upper level BIOL courses, excluding BIOL 4905
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

Selected special or current topics of interest to faculty and students containing a laboratory component. Students may be required to do field work.

BIOL 4905

Undergraduate Research in Biology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: 2-4 credit hours (0-6-2) or (0-9-3) or (0-12-4)

Independent research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Includes literature review, laboratory project, and presentation of results.

BIOL 4910

Biology Internship
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1107, BIOL 1108, and CHEM 1211K and approval of Biology Internship Coordinator and Biology Department Head
Credit Hours: 1-5 credit hours (0-3-1) or (0-6-2) or (0-9-3) or (0-12-4) or (0-15-5)

A supervised work experience program at a previously-approved business, organization, or government entity. This course is intended for junior- or senior-level biology students. May be repeated to total no more than 10 hours of credit.

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BUSINESS

BUSA 1011

Basic Computer Concepts
Prerequisite: Not open to students with previous college-level computer credit
Credit Hours: (0-2-2)

An introductory computer class focusing on basic technical skills of using the Windows operating system, the Internet, email, and word processing. The class will also cover general computer knowledge about how a system works and computer history.

BUSA 1105

Introduction to Business
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An integrative study of the functional areas of business, including finance, operations, marketing, and human resources.

BUSA 2101

Introduction to Business Computer Systems
Prerequisite: Not open to students who are enrolled in EDUC 2401 or who have credit for EDUC 2401.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A survey of Management Information Systems and the application of computers in business and related areas, including hardware, software, data, procedures, human resources, an operating environment, an electronic spreadsheet, a database management system, a presentation management system, and the Internet.

BUSA 2105

Communicating in the Environment of Business
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An analysis and practical applications of the external and internal communications of business organizations.

BUSA 2106

The Environment of Business
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural, environmental, and technological issues which form the context for business, including an overview of the impact of demographic diversity on organization.

BUSA 2120

Introduction to Programming: Visual Basic (Same as CSCI 2102)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1101
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to programming using Visual Basic with emphasis on designing practical applications for Windows, including problem-solving, algorithm development, and Visual Basic syntax for data types, arithmetic and logic operators, control structures, text editors and data file manipulation.

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CHEMISTRY

CHEM 1151K

Survey of Chemistry I
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors (Nursing or Dental Hygiene) and non-science majors. The primary topics covered are measurements, nomenclature, atomic bonding, states of matter, solutions, equilibria, acids, bases, and pH. This course lays the foundation for understanding of biochemical processes. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

CHEM 1152K

Survey of Chemistry II
Prerequisite: CHEM 1151K or CHEM 1211K
Credit Hours: (3-2-4)

Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
Nursing and dental hygiene students planning to pursue a baccalaureate degree may need to enroll in CHEM 1152. This course is also open to non-science majors. Topics to be covered include a study of the classes of the basic functional groups and the reactions of organic molecules, including their common uses and physical and chemical properties. Additionally, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes are introduced.

CHEM 1211K

Principles of Chemistry I
Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 1113 or
eCore Prerequisite: MATH 1113 and MAT 116
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, nomenclature, electronic structure, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, and properties of gases. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

CHEM 1211KH

Honors Principles of Chemistry I
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Coordinator. Must have completed MATH 1111 with a grade of B or better or be an entering freshman with Math SAT of 500 or better (Math ACT 21 or better).
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, nomenclature, electronic structure, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, and properties of gases. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. This course provides opportunities for collaboration and leadership designed to stimulate intellectual development and challenge students studying a physical science.

CHEM 1212K

Principles of Chemistry II
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211K with a C or better or eCore Prerequisite: CHEM 1211 and MATH 1113
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include properties of solids and liquids, solutions, chemical kinetics, acid/base reactions, oxidation/reduction reactions, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

CHEM 1212KH

Honors Principles of Chemistry II
Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 1211KH or acceptance into Honors Program or permission of Honors Program Coordinator
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include properties of solids and liquids, solutions, chemical kinetics, acid/base reactions, oxidation/reduction reactions, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. This course provides opportunities for collaboration and leadership designed to stimulate intellectual development and challenge students studying a physical science.

CHEM 2200

Science, Technology, and the Modern World
Prerequisite: Completion of any science course with lab (4 credit hours) and MATH 1001 or higher.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

This course covers recent advancements in chemisty that have been applied through technology to continually shape and reshape our modern world.

CHEM 2295

Special Research Topics
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211 or CHEM 1151
Credit Hours: (0-3-1)

Faculty guided student research utilizing laboratory, library, and/or computer resources.

CHEM 2300

Quantitative Chemical Analysis
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1212
Credit Hours: (0-3-1)

The lecture portion of this course will cover topics in quantitative analysis, i.e., statistical evaluation of data, gravimetric, volumetric, and selected instrumental methods, including spectrophotometry and separations.

The laboratory portion of this course will cover selected quantitative analytical chemical topics, including gravimetric and volumetric methods, potentiometry, spectrophotometry, and separations.

CHEM 2401K

Organic Chemistry I
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

The fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including classification and naming of organic compounds, interpretation of IR, NMR, and mass spectra data for the identification of organic compounds, synthetic methods, theory of organic reactions, and reaction mechanisms.

CHEM 2402K

Organic Chemistry II
Prerequisite: CHEM 2401K
Credit Hours: (3-3-4)

A second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles of organic chemistry.
 

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COLLOQUIA

COLQ 2900

Fine & Performing Arts Capstone Colloquium
Prerequisite: Completion of 45 credits
Credit Hours: (1-0-1)

A critical examination of the topic of creativity in the visual and performing arts, this course will encourage reflection upon students’ own previous creative work while at Gordon State College.

COLQ 2910

Humanities Capstone Colloquium
Prerequisite: Completion of 45 credits
Credit Hours: (1-0-1)

A critical examination on the place of the humanities and liberal arts in the broader culture, this course will encourage reflection upon students’ own previous work while at Gordon State College.

COLQ 2991

Colloquium in the Humanities
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. Additional prerequisites may be added for a particular colloquium with the approval of the Department Head. See schedule.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A colloquium on selected topics in the humanities emphasizing the development of critical thinking skills.

COLQ 2992

Natural Sciences/Mathematics Colloquium
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. Additional prerequisites may be added for a particular colloquium with the approval of the Department Head. See schedule. Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A colloquium on selected topics in the natural sciences, mathematics, computer science, or allied health professions, emphasizing the development of critical thinking skills.

COLQ 2993

Social Sciences Colloquium
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. Additional prerequisites may be added for a particular colloquium with the approval of the Department Head. See schedule. Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A colloquium on selected topics in the social sciences and social science methodologies emphasizing the development of critical thinking skills.

COLQ 2994H

Honors Colloquium
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102. Additional rerequisites may be added for a particular colloquium with the approval of the Department Head. See schedule. Acceptance into Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Coordinator.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A course intended for students to explore and examine the ideal question of the whole person through writing and discussion of various texts in a seminar format. The course will be interdisciplinary and will emphasize reading, discussion, critical thinking skills and research from different academic disciplines. Students, in their quest for wholeness as persons, can explore their world both locally and globally while realizing their responsibilities as evolving individuals.

COLQ 2995

Global Perspectives
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and HIST 1121 or HIST 1122
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Students will engage in a comparative analysis of political, social, economic, or institutional developments across the globe.

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COMMUNICATION (SPEECH)

COMM 1100

Introduction to Human Communication
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A survey of human communication including discussions of intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public, media, non-verbal, intercultural, and linguistic issues. Various communication performances are required of all students. It includes the development of critical thinking skills through college level writing and the development of research skills. Students are required to become minimally proficient with a range of electronic media including GALILEO, electronic mail, and the World Wide Web.

COMM 1110

Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the basic principles of public speaking, including informative, persuasive, and commemorative speaking, preparation and presentation of speeches, and critical analysis.

COMM 1500

Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to communication as it occurs in a two-person context, emphasizing how individuals use verbal and nonverbal communication to improve social and personal relationships.

COMM 2100

Introduction to Mass Communication
Prerequisite: Completion of both COMM 1110 and ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or better
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Students will examine various sectors of the media industry, including television, radio, print media and the internet as well as explore factors that influence mass communication including government regulations, audiences, technological and advances, and other current trends.

COMM 2180

Special Topics in Communication
Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in COMM 1100
Credit Hours: (0-3-1)

An independent study of a specail topic in the filed of Communication under supervisionof a Communication faculty member.

COMM 2200

Introduction to Intercultural Communication
Prerequisite: Completion of both COMM 1110 and ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or better
Credit Hours: (3-3-0)

An examination of how cultural identity shapes communication practices: students in this course will explore how cross-cultural communication on such subjects as politics, sexuality, religion, family and self can lead to confusion or conflict while exploring as well strategies for successful communication with cultures different from our own.

COMM 2280

Communication Internship
Prerequisite: Approval of the Department Head prior to registration and enrollment in or completion of ENGL 1102.
Credit Hours: 1 to 3 credit hours (0-6-1) or (0-12-2) or (0-18-3)

Provides practical experience in a professional setting appropriate for a student in communication. Will be under the supervision of a skilled practitioner in their particular area of communication.

COMM 3100

Argument & Persuasion
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1102 and COMM 1110 and completion of a 2000 level English course.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A survey and history of formal argumentation and the theories that dominate the field, with additional emphasis placed upon the rhetorical structure of and developmental strategies for persuading an audience within professional contexts.

COMM 3930

Public Relations
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1102
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to the field of Public Relations. Student explore the importance of several factors (e.g. research, planning, strategy, media, ethics, law, and communication) in creating and sustaining relations between a variety of organizations and their key publics.

COMM 3940

Small Group Communication
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1102 and completion of a 2000 level English Course.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Working in small groups requires communication skills in building leadership, performing tasks, resolving conflicts and establishing norms. This course provides a foundation of theory, methods and skills for creating effective small groups and for becoming effective and ethical group members.

COMM 3950

Organizational Communication
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in both ENGL 1102 and completion of a 2000 level English course.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Contemporary theory and intellectual traditions applied to the study of organizations and the role of organizations in society and cultural practices.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 1101

Introduction to Computers and Computer Programming
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An overview of computers and an introduction to programming introducing the history of computing, number systems, data representation, gates and circuits, computing components, von Neumann architecture, machine language, operating systems, networks, text editors, the Internet, email, file storage, simple data types, program control structures, and logic operators.

CSCI 1301

Computer Science I
Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 1113 or higher, or completion of CSCI 1101 with a final grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 1101.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

The course includes an overview of computers and programming; problem solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logic operators; selection structures; repetition structures; text files; arrays (one-and-two-dimensional); procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming (including subprograms or the equivalent).

CSCI 1302

Computer Science II
Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 with a grade of ‘C’ or better.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

The course includes an overview of abstract data types (ADTs); arrays (multi-dimensional) and records; sets and strings; binary files; searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis (including Big-O); recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures (stacks, queues, trees).

CSCI 1371

Computing for Engineers
Prerequisite: MATH 1113
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

Foundations of computing with an introduction to design and analysis of algorithms and an introduction to design and construction of programs for engineering problem-solving.

CSCI 2102

Introduction to Programming: Visual Basic (Same as BUSA 2120)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1101
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to programming using Visual Basic with emphasis on designing practical applications for Windows, including problem-solving, algorithm development, and Visual Basic syntax for data types, arithmetic and logic operators, control structures, text editors and data file manipulation.

CSCI 2201

C++ Programming
Prerequisite: CSCI 1301
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A detailed introduction to the concepts of programming logic and algorithms using the C++ Programming Language. Topics include simple data types, arithmetic and logic operators, selection structures, repetition structures, text files, and arrays.

CSCI 2410

Foundations of Database Design
Prerequisite: BUSA 2101, ITEC 2215, or CSCI 1101
Credit hours: (3-0-3)

This foundational course presents terminology, basic concepts, and applications of database processing including file organization and data structures. The course emphasizes database design using various modeling techniques; database implementation using the relational model, normalization, and SQL. Students will design, create and process a database to demonstrate competency in the course content.

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRJU 1100

Introduction to Criminal Justice
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the philosophical and cultural origins of the American criminal justice system.

CRJU 2001

Introduction to Law Enforcement
Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of instructor
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the development of the police system in the United States.

CRJU 2003

Introduction to Corrections
Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of instructor
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to corrections as a component of the administration of the justice system.

CRJU 2005

Introduction to Criminal Investigation
Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of instructor
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the procedures of criminal investigation.

CRJU 2010

Introduction to Criminal Law
Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or permission of instructor
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the development of criminal law with emphasis on the Georgia penal code.

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ECONOMICS

ECON 2105

Principles of Macroeconomics
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the concepts and analysis of economic aggregates and policies.

ECON 2106

Principles of Microeconomics
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the concepts and analysis of the structure and performance of the market economy.

ECON 2106H

Honors Principles of Microeconomics
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Coordinator
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

This honors course focuses on the individual behavior of households and firms that maximize their return. The cost and production structure is examined to find out how firms make decisions and maximize profits. The analysis of the structure and performance of the market economy is studied by investigating the four markets, namely perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly. In addition, some analysis will be done with regard to public policy and its impact on society.

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EDUCATION

EDUC 2110

Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)
This course is designed for students who are considering becoming P-12 teachers.

This course engages students in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. Fieldwork required.

EDUC 2120

Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)
This course is designed for students who are considering becoming P-12 teachers.

Given the rapidly changing demographics in our state and country, this course is designed to equip future teachers with the fundamental knowledge of understanding culture and teaching children from diverse backgrounds. Specifically, this course is designed to examine 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definitions and implications of diversity, and 4) the influences of culture on learning, development, and pedagogy. Fieldwork required.

EDUC 2130

Exploring Learnaing and Teaching
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in either EDUC 2110 or EDUC 2120

Explore key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. Fieldwork required.

EDUC 2401

Introduction to Instructional Technology
Prerequisite: Not open to students who are enrolled in BUSA 2101 or who have credit for BUSA 2101.
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to basic instructional design, computer utilization, and selected instructional technologies. Selection and utilization of technology resources will also be addressed.

EDUC 3000

Integrated Applied Arts: Art, Music, Creative Performance, and Movement
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

This course is designed to give students experiences in selecting and presenting art activities, stories, plays, music and dance activities which enhance and are, in turn, enhanced by other subject areas within a thematic unit framework.

EDUC 3002

Assessment in Elementary Education
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

A study of appropriate strategies for assessing the learning of young children. Formal assessment strategies, authentic assessment strategies, and teacher-developed strategies are introduced. The role of assessment in accountability within the context of child and school evaluation is examined. Field experience required.

EDUC 3003

Classroom Management
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

The course will acquaint students with standards and skills for organizing and managing classrooms and behavior for children of diverse developmental levels, abilities, ethnicity, culture, language, and exceptionalities in grades P-5. Field experience required.

EDUC 3005

Middle and Secondary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment
Prerequisite: Admission into a Teacher Certification Program
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

This course provides a study of general planning, teaching methodologies and strategies, and evaluation strategies for the middle level and secondary classroom. This includes, classroom management, use of educational technology, daily planning and assessment strategies.

EDUC 3090

Classroom Data Analysis
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of            Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (1-0-1)

The course is taught in combination with student teaching in the final semester. Candidates will work with actual data of students they are teaching, including teacher developed assessments and state/national testing data. Content will also include understanding and interpretation of statistics derived from scaled scores in criterion-referenced tests, norm-referenced test data, Georgia’s Criterion Referenced Competency Tests and interpretation for meeting Adequate Yearly Progress under the No Child Left Behind Act, and disaggregation of data for sub-groups of the student population.

EDUC 3200

Instructional Technology and Media
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of            Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

An introduction to the wide range of computer-based instructional media materials and equipment available for classroom use. The course focuses on the development of skills needed for effective instructional media production, applications and utilization. Candidates begin production of their on-line portfolios. Course fulfills requirements of the Georgia Technology Standards for Educators.

EDUC 3300

Integrated Social Studies for Elementary Education
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of            Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (3-0-3)

This course is a study of the social curriculum for children in grades P-5. Objectives, concepts, content techniques, materials, methods of inquiry, and evaluative procedures for teaching and learning in the primary grades are emphasized. A foundation for the use of the social sciences to support learning and the integration of content across the curriculum will be provided. Field experience required.

EDUC 3500

Professionalism: Field Experience I
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of            Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (1-5-1)

Field experiences facilitate candidates’ development as professional educators by providing opportunities for candidates to observe reading and mathematics instruction in schools, tutor students, assist teachers or other school personnel, and participate in education-related community events prior to clinical practice.

EDUC 3501

Professionalism: Field Experience II
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of            Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (1-5-2)

Field experiences and clinical practice provide opportunities for candidates to develop and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions for helping all students learn. All candidates participate in field experiences or clinical practice that include students with exceptionalities and students from diverse ethnic, racial, gender, and socioeconomic groups.

EDUC 3502

Professionalism: Field Experience III
Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy, Bachelor of            Science, Elementary Education
Credit Hours: (1-5-2)

Field experiences and clinical practice provide opportunities for candidates to develop and demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to curriculum development, assessment and evaluation, and pedagogy including use of technologies appropriate to child development.
EDUC 3504

Seminar in Secondary School Practicum
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 3505
Credit Hours: (1-0-1)

This course is designed to assist the candidate in preparing materials and artifacts for edTPA.

EDUC 3505

Secondary Practicum
Prerequisite: Admission into one of the Secondary Certification Programs
Credit Hours: (0-8-2)

Field experiences facilitate candidates’ development as professional educators by providing opportunities for candidates to observe content area instruction in schools, tutor students, assist teachers or other school personnel, and participate in education-related community events prior to clinical practice.

EDUC 3506

Middle School Practicum I
Prerequisite: Admission to Middle Grades Education Program, EDUC 3600, and EDUC 3610
Credit Hours: (0-8-2)

Opportunity to observe and participate in classroom activities in a supervised grade 4-8 public school setting.

EDUC 3507

Seminar in Middle School Practicum
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 3506 Practicum in Middle Grades Education. Must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program for Middle Grades Education
Credit Hours: (1-0-1)

This is a weekly seminar course that candidates in Middle Grades Practicum will take to understand and work with a Gordon State Professor on requirements for edTPA and tiered licensing for Georgia.